Protocols for Imaging Studies in the Oncologic Patient

Chapter 42 Protocols for Imaging Studies in the Oncologic Patient



Well-thought-out protocols imaging sophisticated imaging studies are critical to ensure that the resultant images have the best possible chance to answer the clinical question. In the case of oncologic patients, this usually hinges on whether disease is stable, has regressed, or has progressed and whether there are new sites of disease. Beyond this fundamental question, our patients may have unexpected findings as well as complications from therapy. The ability to answer such questions relies on high-quality images and, in the case of computed tomography (CT), the best quality titrated with the least radiation exposure because patients generally go into a lifetime of surveillance. This is a significant challenge. In patients undergoing imaging for surgical intervention, especially for cure, these studies need to be directly targeted to the most likely sites of metastases (e.g., high-quality liver imaging for metastases in patients with orbital, choroidal melanoma) and have optimal image quality to detect metastatic disease.15 Imaging with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can be performed in multiple phases, and developing protocols to detect hyper- as well as hypovascular metastases is critical in evaluating patients with tumors such as carcinoid, islet cell tumors of the pancreas, and a number of other primaries. Timing of the contrast bolus and subsequent imaging is critical in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as current MDCT scanning.68


The charts provide a selection of common protocols developed by authors of this textbook and utilized in their daily practice. The protocols were prepared January 2010. They are grouped together in one chapter rather than being individually recorded for the reader’s convenience. They are simply provided for a reference within the context of this textbook, and scanning protocols should be developed and tailored to each individual physician’s practice.



MDCT: CT Imaging




Abdomen/Pelvis Protocols (MDCT 64 Slice)




Abdomen with Contrast


Abdomen without Contrast


Abdomen without and with Contrast


Abdomen and Pelvis with Contrast


Abdomen and Pelvis without Contrast


Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Adrenals: Abdomen with Contrast


Adrenals: Abdomen without and with Contrast


Adrenals: Abdomen and Pelvis with Contrast


Adrenals: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Adrenals: Chest and Abdomen with Contrast


Adrenals: Chest and Abdomen without and with Contrast


Adrenals: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis with Contrast


Adrenals: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Angiogram/Venogram: Abdomen


Angiogram/Venogram: Abdomen and Pelvis


Appendiceal/Peritoneal: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Appendiceal/Peritoneal: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Bowel Carcinoid: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Chest and Abdomen with Contrast


Chest and Abdomen without Contrast


Chest and Abdomen without and with Contrast


Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis with Contrast


Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without Contrast


Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


CT Colonography


CT Cystogram


Gastric: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Kidney Stone


KUB for Barium


Liver: Abdomen without and with Contrast


Liver: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Liver: Chest and Abdomen without and with Contrast


Liver: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Lymphoma with Contrast


Lymphoma without Contrast


Lymphoma without and with Contrast


Pancreas: Abdomen without and with Contrast


Pancreas: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Pancreas: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Pancreatic Islet Cell: Abdomen without and with Contrast


Post Cystectomy: Abdomen and Pelvis with Contrast


Post Cystectomy: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis with Contrast


Post Cystectomy: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Renal: Abdomen with Contrast


Renal: Chest and Abdomen without and with Contrast


Renal: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Renal + 3D: Abdomen without and with Contrast


Renal + 3D: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Renal + 3D: Chest and Abdomen without and with Contrast


Renal + 3D: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


CT Runoff


CT Runoff (Fast)


Enterography (Small Bowel): Abdomen and Pelvis with Contrast


Enterography (Small Bowel): Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Enterography (Small Bowel): Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis with Contrast


Enterography (Small Bowel): Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Urogram: Abdomen and Pelvis without and with Contrast


Urogram: Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis without and with Contrast





MDCT: CT Imaging



Chest Protocols (MDCT 64 Slice)















Abdomen/Pelvis Protocols (MDCT 64 Slice)














Mar 6, 2016 | Posted by in GENERAL RADIOLOGY | Comments Off on Protocols for Imaging Studies in the Oncologic Patient
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