Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Posterior Pharyngeal Wall

Chapter 70


Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Posterior Pharyngeal Wall


Epidemiology


The pharyngeal wall consists of the posterior and lateral pharyngeal mucosa that extends to the nasopharynx, superiorly, esophageal inlet, inferiorly, and tonsils laterally. The incidence is more common in males with the peak incidence between 60 and 70 years of age. The most common risk factors are excessive tobacco and alcohol use.


Clinical Findings


Stages of oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer are presented in Tables 70–1 and 70–2, respectively. The most common complaint is sore throat. As these tumors progress (Fig. 70–1), patients may complain of dysphagia, foreign sensation, ear pain, blood-tinged saliva, aspiration, and change in voice quality. Patients with advanced disease may present with weight loss or a palpable neck mass indicative of a nodal metastasis.

























Table 70–1 Sixth American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging Classification for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma (Involving the Posterior Pharyngeal Wall)

TIS


Carcinoma in situ


T1


Tumor ≤ 2 cm in greatest diameter


T2


Tumor > 2 cm but ≤ 4 cm in greatest diameter


T3


Tumor > 4 cm in greatest diameter


T4a


Tumor invades larynx, deep/extrinsic muscle of tongue, medial pterygoid, hard palate, or mandible


T4b


Tumor invades lateral pterygoid muscle, pterygoid plates, lateral nasopharynx, or skull base or encases carotid artery









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Dec 27, 2015 | Posted by in HEAD & NECK IMAGING | Comments Off on Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Posterior Pharyngeal Wall
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Table 70–2 Sixth American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging Classification for Hypopharyngeal (Involving the Posterior Pharyngeal Wall)

T1